Become a Fan on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

 Get my bi-weekly blog updates via e-mail:

 

Checklist for a Complete Medical Check: Men

by on August 31, 2013 >> 2 Comments
  • Sharebar

When it comes to a man’s car, there is nothing more important to him. He tunes it regularly, polishes it, ensures it is in tip top shape, thinks about it constantly…well maybe a little less than he thinks about sex. The point is guys, you need to make your body a priority and get regular health checkups on top of your extreme exercises. This will help you stay around to drive that lovely, sparkling vehicle, well into your 70’s.

Eating the right foods and portions, as well as exercising is very important, but we are human and prone to health problems. The only sure way to know what’s going on inside your body is to visit your doctor regularly in order for him/her to check what you can’t see from the outside. I am a firm believer in “Preventive Care” and being proactive is the best way to prevent many illnesses from developing, instead of treating them after they have developed. Motor vehicles get regular checkups, airplanes too, so what about you? Don’t wait for symptoms! Most often show up when it’s already too late!

Knowing the medical checks needed, the age at which they must be done, and getting them done is a huge plus towards ensuring ourselves a healthier lifespan. Let’s take a look at the necessary checkups, and the age range for them:

Important Tests By Age:

Men Between Ages 18 – 40

Men between this age range should have preventive health checks by their primary care physician, including blood pressure, and height/weight checks – every two years, and not exceeding a five year period at any time for a medical check. (If you do not have a primary care physician at this point, it is not too late. Make it your priority to locate one as soon as possible.) See Evaluating Your Medical Care: How To Find a Suitable Physician to help you with tips in finding a great Primary Care Physician (PCP).

Vision examination (Super important, especially if you have a family history of eye problems.)

Dental examination (every 6 months or as recommended by your dentist)

Cholesterol testing (every 5 years – starting at age 40).

Screening for testicular cancer, including monthly self exams. (Like women’s monthly breast self exams, this is important.)

Your doctor may want to do an electrocardiogram to check for heart disease, and blood tests to screen for diabetes, thyroid disease, liver problems, and anemia – depending on your individual circumstances.

Your doctor may also recommend screening for skin cancer, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV infection, and alcohol abuse – depending on your risk factors

Tetanus immunization (every 10 years)

Polio, rubella, pneumococcal immunizations (when indicated)

Men Between Ages 41 – 59

Men between this age range should have preventive health checks by their primary care physician, including blood pressure, and height/weight checks – every two years.

Vision and hearing examination

Dental examination (every 6 months or as recommended by your dentist)

Cholesterol Test (every 3 years after a baseline test at age 40)

Screening for testicular cancer, including monthly self exams.

Stool blood test (yearly after age 50)

Screening for coronary heart disease (at age 45)

Electrocardiogram (EKG)

Diabetes or Blood Glucose Test (every 3 years – starting at age 45)

Screening for Type II diabetes (every 3 years – starting at age 50)

Screening for prostate cancer

Screening for colon cancer with fecal occult blood testing – colonoscopy, or sigmoidoscopy (every 5 years – starting at age 50)

Chest X-Ray (every 3 years – starting at age 45)

Screening for lipid disorders

Screening for depression

Your doctor may also recommend screening for skin cancer, oral cancer, sexually transmitted diseases, and alcohol abuse – depending on your risk factors

Tetanus immunization (every 10 years)

Men Age 60 and Over

Men in this age group should get annual physical exams by their primary care physician, including blood pressure, and height/weight checks.

Vision and hearing examination

Dental examination (every 6 months or as recommended by your dentist)

Cholesterol testing (every 5 years)

Screening for testicular cancer, including monthly self exams.

Screening for coronary heart disease

Electrocardiogram (EKG)

Diabetes screening

Screening for Type II diabetes

Screening for prostate cancer

Screening for colon cancer with fecal occult blood testing – colonoscopy, or sigmoidoscopy

Screening for lipid disorders

Screening for depression

Have a discussion with your physician about having you screened for abdominal aortic aneurysm, and carotid artery ultrasound screening

Screening for osteoporosis

Screening for dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

Follow-up colorectal screening based on your previous results. (Screening is not recommended if you are 85 years old and over)

Your doctor may also recommend screening for skin cancer, oral cancer, sexually transmitted diseases, and alcohol abuse – depending on your risk factors

Chest X-Ray

Tetanus immunization (every 10 years)

Influenza immunization (yearly after age 65)

Pneumococcal immunization (doctor must ensure you are not at risk before giving you this shot)

Proctoscopy (every 3 years)

The Physical Exam:

Height and weight check
Hearing and vision check
Testicular exam
Rectal exam
Heart and lung check
Blood pressure reading

Basic Medical Tests:

Blood Glucose Test
This test measures the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood from a blood sample. Abnormally high level of glucose suggests the possibility of diabetes, which is a prompt that other tests must be done in order to rule out that possibility, or confirm so that proper treatment can begin.

Cholesterol Test
This test measures the amount of cholesterol in the blood from a blood sample. High levels of cholesterol in the blood indicate an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. When this happens, a drastic change will need to be made to the diet to cut all Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and start eating healthier, as well as doing other things your doctor order so as to get your cholesterol and overall health back in good standing.

Proctoscopy or Sigmoidoscopy
This test is designed to examine the lower gastrointestinal tract for cancer, colitis or rectal polyps. It is done by inserting a tubular instrument through the rectum into the colon enabling the physician to check for abnormalities.

Stool Blood Test or Occult Blood Test
This test detects very small amounts of blood in the stool that might indicate early signs of colon cancer. This test can either be done at home or at the physician’s office. It is done by taking smears from three different bowel movements after several days on a meat-free diet.

Some of the tests may be a little uncomfortable, but if something is there that was not treated because the particular test was not done, think of the pain it will cause you when it escalates to that point where the pain eventually summons you to the doctor.

Also, do not create health problems for yourself by trying to do too much. Be sure that you get enough sleep, eat well, and keep reasonable hours during the working week.

Subscribe to this blog.

Related Posts:

Checklist for a Complete Medical Check: Women

Evaluating Your Medical Care: How to Find A Suitable Physician

Evaluating Your Dental Care: How to Find a Suitable Dentist

High-Tech Tests That Could Save Lives

How to Recognize a Heart Attack

Smoking and Health: How Cigarette Smoke Affects The Body

How to Use a Prescription Drug Safely

What Being Overweight Does to Your Body

“Smoking Kills” Quit Smoking


RECOMMENDED PRODUCTS:

Tags: ,

2 Responses to Checklist for a Complete Medical Check: Men

  1. Janice on October 25, 2013 at 2:19 pm

    For real Katherine, their car come first! I actually had it out with this guy one too many time, about his car obsession, had to call it quits. They don’t even want to hear about the doctor, yet they spend all their time doctoring their car. Hope they see this blog post; going to send this link to all my “car obsessed” male friends.

    • Matthew on October 25, 2013 at 2:32 pm

      Not all men do, but I have to admit many of my collegues do. I don’t too much like the doctor’s office but I try to stay on par with my health. Love your list Marie, and appreciate you researching and putting this out here.

      Thanks.

Leave a Reply to Janice Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

CommentLuv badge

Search This Site

FaceBook Fans